UK : sondage sur l'utilisation publique de la reconnaissance faciale



  • Intéressant même si pas follement encourageant...

    Published today by the Ada Lovelace Institute, the survey shows that the British public are prepared to accept use of facial recognition technology in some instances, when there is a clear public benefit and where appropriate safeguards are put in place, but they also want the government to impose restrictions on its use.

    The Ada Lovelace Institute is calling for companies to temporarily stop selling and using facial recognition technology while the public is consulted on its use. It will lead public consultation by establishing the Citizens’ Biometric Council, a citizens’ assembly supported by the Information Commissioner’s Office.
    The nationally representative survey of 4,109 adults was undertaken in partnership with YouGov and reveals:

    • A majority of people (55%) want the government to impose restrictions on police use of facial recognition technology. Nearly one third (29%) of the public are uncomfortable with police using facial recognition technology in any circumstance.
    • Nearly half the public (46%) want the right to opt out of the use of facial recognition technology. This figure is higher for people from minority ethnic groups (56%), for whom the technology is less accurate.
    • Most people oppose the use of facial recognition technology by companies for commercial benefit, often because they don’t trust the technology will be used ethically. For example, 77% are uncomfortable with facial recognition technology being used in shops to track customers and 76% are uncomfortable with it being used by HR departments in recruitment.
    • The public supports companies voluntarily pausing sales of facial recognition technology to police (50%) and schools (70%) to allow for further public consultation.
    • People fear the normalisation of surveillance but are prepared to accept facial recognition technology when there is a clear public benefit, provided safeguards are in place. For example, nearly half (49%) support the use of facial recognition technology in day to day policing, assuming appropriate safeguards are in place, but the majority are opposed to its use in schools (67%) or on public transport (61%).
      Source : https://www.adalovelaceinstitute.org/beyond-face-value-public-attitudes-to-facial-recognition-technology/

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